Common Core Standards K-5 Mathematics

Common Core State Standards Connections
K-5 Mathematics

Chess is a learning tool for the development of the mind that just happens to be a game. Chess is already making a strong contribution to children’s learning in schools across the country. Now, we can show you how the Championship Chess (CC) Scholastic Chess Series can help you meet Common Core State Standards as you enhance overall learning.

Mathematics K-5

Two goals of the Common Core State Standards are to make mathematics literacy part of everyday decisions and to support mathematical thinking and problem-solving. The standards address mathematical practices, including problem-solving, mathematical reasoning, communication, representation and connections. Students are encouraged to think critically to discover different possible solutions. As in chess, reasoned, logical connections make mathematics understandable.

Counting and Cardinality (K) § Students know number names, count in sequence and connect numbers to quantity. CC: As students count and use the ranks, files and diagonals on the chessboard, they apply numeration to identify how and how far the pieces move.
Geometry
  • Students reason with shapes and their attributes.
    (K-3)
  • Students use the coordinate system.     ( 4-5)   
CC: Students use the algebraic grid of the chessboard to identify relative positions of the pieces on the quadrants of the board and apply this to the annotation, evaluation and description of best moves.
Algebra (4-5) § Students generate and analyze patterns. CC: Students use the algebraic grid of the chessboard to identify relative positions of the pieces on the quadrants of the board and apply this to the annotation, evaluation and description of best moves.
Mathematical Practices (K-5) § Students will:
(1) make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
(2) reason abstractly and quantitatively.
(3) construct viable arguments; and,
(4) model with mathematics and use appropriate tools strategically. 
CC: (1) Every time a move is made on the chessboard there is a new problem to solve. (2) Students have to analyze and evaluate to verify options and select the best move. (3) Using algebraic notation, students “speak chess,” analyzing space and viewpoint to formulate and to answer questions. (4) Such concepts as even and odd; vertical, horizontal and diagonal; pattern recognition; and, solving multistep problems apply to chess play.

 

Login

Registered users login here.





Blog Entries

Affiliates | Jobs | Store

Copyright © 2016. 

Championship Chess
A Subsidiary of Teachable Tech, Inc.

All Rights Reserved.